liv, 23, ny.
a damn mess.

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lareinaana:

White women cannot be intersectional though. Like, intersectional isn’t an adjective, it isn’t a verb, it isn’t a descriptor of a person. Its “intersectional experiences” that matter and are the crux of the whole “conversation.” There is no “being intersectional” involved.

The whole damn point of the concept was to address that the experiences of Black women were not simply racism + sexism, but a whole new “intersection” of experience. Taking this concept by Kimberle and making it a moniker to show how new wave feminist you are is the same tired shit that white women always pull, absorbing and regurgitating concepts that they scarcely even comprehend.

The best you could possibly is say is that you recognize the intersectional experiences of those you cannot begin to truly understand. That’s it. You are not “intersectional” it isn’t a new name for you to tack onto your blog header.

(via: tigerkit / by: lareinaana) #intersectionality #psa
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(Source: hotiphoto)

(via: sickpage / by: hotiphoto) #photography #pink
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The Ultimate Eyeliner Fashion Vocabulary
More Visual Glossaries (for Her): Backpacks / Bags / Bobby Pins / Bra Types / Hats / Belt knots / Coats / Collars / Darts / Dress Shapes / Dress Silhouettes / Eyeglass frames / Eyeliner Strokes / Hangers / Harem Pants / Heels / Lingerie / Nail shapes / Necklaces / Necklines / Patterns (Part1) / Patterns (Part 2) / Puffy Sleeves / Scarf Knots / Shoes / Shorts / Silhouettes / Skirts / Tartans / Tops / Underwear / Vintage Hats / Waistlines / Wedding Gown Silhouettes / Wool
Source: Enerie Fashion

The Ultimate Eyeliner Fashion Vocabulary

More Visual Glossaries (for Her): Backpacks / Bags / Bobby Pins / Bra Types / HatsBelt knots / CoatsCollarsDarts / Dress Shapes / Dress Silhouettes / Eyeglass frames / Eyeliner Strokes / Hangers / Harem PantsHeels / Lingerie / Nail shapes / NecklacesNecklines / Patterns (Part1) / Patterns (Part 2) / Puffy Sleeves / Scarf Knots / Shoes / ShortsSilhouettes / SkirtsTartans / Tops / Underwear / Vintage Hats / Waistlines / Wedding Gown Silhouettes / Wool

Source: Enerie Fashion

(via: taetv / by: fashioninfographics) #reblog this save a life etc #makeup
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flickerman:

since i’ve been talking so much about my uni app i’ll show you something i made!

"illustrate one of your interests" was the assignment, and i chose personal style (clothes, makeup, hair, everything). and made a doll. miriam nicole doll, coming with a set of tiny clothes.

this took about a month to make. i had to draw three versions of myself, take photos of my clothes, print the textures, cut out tiny little clothes, wrinkle the paper, sew the garnments together (with a sewing machine), make a pattern, make the boxes, draw the illustrations on the backs, glue everything together… i was lucky to find a real barbie doll from my childhood, but had to tweak her appearance in photoshop.

here are a few photos from the shoot, i’ll probably post the rest the day i make a portfolio. this was definitely the weirdest thing i made, i can’t even explain the creepiness of seeing tiny versions of yourself in cardboard boxes.

(via: flickerman / by: flickerman) #miriam flickerman
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Almost

Almost

(via: belledamn / by: nevver)
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Kagome’s cute hairstyles appreciation post

(Source: hojo-kun)

(via: pnktape / by: hojo-kun) #bby girl...... #(((leave me alone)))
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(Source: fmtownsmarty)

(via: violators / by: fmtownsmarty)
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From Here To There: A growing map of Manhattan made only of directions from strangers on scraps. 

(Source: bludot)

(via: yeoja / by: bludot) #art
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Karyn Parson’s Mission to Share the Untold Stories of Black History Heroes
by Jessica Dickerson
Hilary Banks from The Fresh Prince of Bel-Air may not have been known as a fierce advocate for education. But the actress who played her sure is. 
Last year, Karyn Parsons — actress, mother, author and amateur historian — founded Sweet Blackberry, a nonprofit devoted to teaching kids about some of the lesser-known figures of black history. The organization publishes books and videos on people like Henry “Box” Brown and Garrett Morgan, and facilitates school visits and children’s workshops centered around promoting ‘creativity, literacy skills and social responsibility.’
Sweet Blackberry recently launched a Kickstarter for its latest project, a short film that will tell the story of Janet Collins, the first African-American prima ballerina in the Metropolitan Ballet. Collins, who died in 2003 at age 86, rose to fame despite being shut out of dance theaters that refused to let her perform unless it was in whiteface…The Huffington Post spoke with Parsons about Sweet Blackberry’s history and its mission. As the Sweet Blackberry website proclaims: ‘This culture is American culture; this history is American History’…continue reading HuffPost’s interview with Karyn Parson
Photo

Karyn Parson’s Mission to Share the Untold Stories of Black History Heroes

by Jessica Dickerson

Hilary Banks from The Fresh Prince of Bel-Air may not have been known as a fierce advocate for education. But the actress who played her sure is.

Last year, Karyn Parsons — actress, mother, author and amateur historian — founded Sweet Blackberry, a nonprofit devoted to teaching kids about some of the lesser-known figures of black history. The organization publishes books and videos on people like Henry “Box” Brown and Garrett Morgan, and facilitates school visits and children’s workshops centered around promoting ‘creativity, literacy skills and social responsibility.’

Sweet Blackberry recently launched a Kickstarter for its latest project, a short film that will tell the story of Janet Collins, the first African-American prima ballerina in the Metropolitan Ballet. Collins, who died in 2003 at age 86, rose to fame despite being shut out of dance theaters that refused to let her perform unless it was in whiteface…The Huffington Post spoke with Parsons about Sweet Blackberry’s history and its mission. As the Sweet Blackberry website proclaims: ‘This culture is American culture; this history is American History’…continue reading HuffPost’s interview with Karyn Parson

Photo

(via: unimpressed2chainz / by: blackchildrensbooksandauthors) #history #karyn parsons
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"

Every year, I try to do at least two things with my students at least once. First, I make a point of addressing them as “philosophers” – a bit cheesy, but hopefully it encourages active learning.

Secondly, I say something like this: “I’m sure you’ve heard the expression ‘everyone is entitled to their opinion.’ Perhaps you’ve even said it yourself, maybe to head off an argument or bring one to a close. Well, as soon as you walk into this room, it’s no longer true. You are not entitled to your opinion. You are only entitled to what you can argue for.”

A bit harsh? Perhaps, but philosophy teachers owe it to our students to teach them how to construct and defend an argument – and to recognize when a belief has become indefensible.

The problem with “I’m entitled to my opinion” is that, all too often, it’s used to shelter beliefs that should have been abandoned. It becomes shorthand for “I can say or think whatever I like” – and by extension, continuing to argue is somehow disrespectful. And this attitude feeds, I suggest, into the false equivalence between experts and non-experts that is an increasingly pernicious feature of our public discourse.

"
No, you’re not entitled to your opinion (via kiransingh)

(Source: pbnpineapples)

(via: cuntstruck / by: pbnpineapples) #words #*